Review: Opal Charm + Interview with Author Miri Castor

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The titular character of Opal Charm: The Path to Dawn, a YA fantasy novel, is a Black (pre-)teen girl living in the quiet New York suburb of Dewdrop with her parents and sister. But Opal isn’t having the best time what with the death of her older brother, her sister alway snapping at her, no friends and parents who are in turns distant and all up in her space. Things seem to look up, however, when a new girl, Hope Adair, befriends Opal and Opal reconnects with her childhood friend Aaron. But Opal keeps having these unsettling dreams and there’s more to Hope than meets the eye.

Opal is an unlikely heroine and a very reluctant one at that. Through much of the book, we also see her suffering from depression and having withdrawn from friends and others. Opal can be unlikable and difficult, but her depression and isolation grow out of grief, and I found myself empathizing with her, but also her family who were clearly overwhelmed with the situation. I thought I’d mention this as for much of the first part of the book the reason for Opal’s behavior might not be clear and some might read her as simply annoying and be put off.

The Path to Dawn is the first part of a book series and I really enjoyed the focus on Opal’s situation and her overcoming isolation and reconnecting with people. It is only in the latter part of the book that the Chosen One aspect of the story really kicks off and we learn a bit about the troubled world of Athre and the gifts Athrians and Opal share, cause make no mistake this is gonna be a superhero story! A superhero who happens to be a Black girl, yass! I’m so happy to see more stories where the chosen one isn’t a white dude.

All in all I really enjoyed reading the beginning of Opal’s story. At times the dialogue and reactions by the characters felt a bit off to me especially in the first few chapters and I would have liked to see a deeper exploration of Opal and Hope’s developing friendship. But I liked the long exposition and the focus on Opal’s struggles and the showdown at the end of this book seems like a promise that readers will find out what motivates the different factions fighting in Athre. I’m also hoping to see more of how Opal’s family might reconnect and heal. I’ll be reading Hope in Nautical Dusk or sure.

Make sure to scroll down to hear from the author, Miri Castor!

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Disclaimer: I was given a free e-copy of this book by the author, but never fear I remain my opinionated self!

Other thoughts:

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(yours?)

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Miri Castor is the author of Opal Charm: The Path to Dawn. She spent many recesses in middle school writing fantasy stories, with Opal Charm being one of many. She has written for Black Girl Magic Literary Magazine and was featured as a Spotlight New Author in 2016.
Now attending a university on the East Coast, she studies biochemistry and will receive her B.S. in 2016. A New York native, Miri is working on her second novel while in her last year as an undergraduate. She enjoys playing video games, attending music concerts, and strolling through the City.

Bina: What made you start writing and how do you manage writing while attending college?

Miri Castor: I was a huge bookworm back in the day. It started with me replacing the protagonists of my favorite SFF cartoons with my own characters when I was around eight years old. Then I started thinking after a few years, “wouldn’t it be cool to give them their own stories?” And that’s where I started.

Well, it was much easier when I was an undergraduate and had month-long breaks! As a college senior, I had a lot of time to dedicate to writing since I took a few classes. Now that I’m a first year in a PhD program, it’s a bit harder to manage with studies and research. I write with any downtime I can get.

Bina: Where do you draw your inspiration from?

Miri Castor: As a nerd, I’m inspired by my favorite video games, anime, and a handful of fantasy authors, like Tananarive Due. Music is another major source of inspiration. Janelle Monáe’s music and style got me hooked into afrofuturism, as well as Solange, and a handful of alternative R&B singers.

Bina: What is your process with regard to feedback and editing as a self-published author?

Miri: I try to learn from all feedback I get, good or bad. I don’t let it interfere with my original ideas though. I feel like it’s definitely more personal as a self-published author to receive feedback because you usually don’t have a team behind you. You’re the editor, the artist (possibly), and the author.

Bina: Do you feel that self-publishing gives you more leeway with regard to diversity?

Miri: Definitely. I’d like to think in the near future traditional publishers won’t be as reluctant to showcase diverse books as they are now.

Bina: In Opal you’ve created a (reluctant) superhero, who is also a young Black girl. Can you tell us about reading (or not) about Black characters growing up and what you hope to contribute to issues of representation with your books?

Miri: “Reluctant” is such a nice way of putting it, haha! That aside, the only black characters I read growing up were from urban fiction books. These characters were from the hood, and had to deal with issues around family, school, and their environment. It wasn’t a bad thing, but that was the only representation I got for black girls as a kid. I would’ve loved to have read fantasy stories about magical black girls who became the chosen ones, and had to save the world.

My main goal with the Opal Charm series is to have humanizing portrayals of people of color, and to write stories the 12-year-old me would love.

Bina: The Path to Dawn is the first book in a series, how many books are you planning and can you tell us a bit about what’s next for Opal?

Miri: I’ve planned for 4 books for the main series, but I also have prequels and spinoffs in mind. I’m especially excited to get started on the prequels!

Opal’s got a lot in store for her. She undergoes training to protect Earth and the alternate world Athre, while learning more about her powers, the secrets of each JAEL member, and herself. All I can say is Opal’s hopes for the future will be put to the test.

Bina: Thanks so much for answering my questions!

twitter Connect with Miri on twitter!

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21 thoughts on “Review: Opal Charm + Interview with Author Miri Castor

  1. Thank you for this review ad the author Q & A! I heard about this book a bit ago and I am happy to hear a positive review! I love the inspiration that the author has in this series -> to humanizes people of color and have stories about magical black girls who are chosen to save the world. Brilliant.

    Also, it’s great to see you back on the blog game 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Brendon!😊 I’m glad I gave this one a try and hope you’ll enjoy it if you get to it! Opal is super reluctant but yeah it’s so wonderful to have more Black girls ne Chosen ones 😊

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for stopping by!😊 I don’t have kids so hard to tell but there’s no sex and I don’t remember swearing. The dreams and Opal’s depression are a bit tough to take but I think 6th grader should be fine😊

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m glad this is a Chosen One narrative. There are so many that feature white protagonists and few with POC in Fantasy. The more we have, the more we’ll be able to recommend them as alternatives to the traditional white Chosen One books!

    This book sounds interesting. I will wait for the second book to see how the series progresses, but I may buy it if it goes on sale on Kindle or something.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, glad you liked the post 😊 Oh yeah love the Monae-Butler connection 🙌 Loving more superheroes, Black Girl chosen one, different hero Jess in Not Your Sidekick.

      Like

  3. “I would’ve loved to have read fantasy stories about magical black girls who became the chosen ones, and had to save the world.
    My main goal with the Opal Charm series is to have humanizing portrayals of people of color, and to write stories the 12-year-old me would love.”

    Love this! Great review and interview Bina. Nice to see your name pop up in my inbox again 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I really like that the main character’s mental health isn’t dismissed and is a part of her personality–and isn’t considered “annoying.” I say this as someone who had a meltdown in the mall yesterday and ran out of a store without paying for her purchases. *sigh* Don’t worry; I went back and claimed the items I’d abandoned on the counter.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh no, hope getting outside helped!! Oh ffft abandoning stuff isn’t a problem right? Rushing outside w the stuff would be more complicated.
      Yeah I think the problem is that the reader needs to recognize depression and not dismiss the character as annoying. I found the perspective of Opal really helped, you could feel everything being heavy and dragging.

      Liked by 1 person

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