10 WOC Releases in February 2018

pic releases feb

How did January pass by so quickly? I feel very old saying this but there you go. On the upside a new month means new releases to enjoy and there are some truly excellent WOC reads coming out in February (all links go to goodreads):

Fiction:

1)Feel Free: Essays by Zadie Smith – (Feb. 6th)

zadie

“Gathering in one place for the first time previously unpublished work, as well as already classic essays, such as, “Joy,” and, “Find Your Beach,” Feel Free offers a survey of important recent events in culture and politics, as well as Smith’s own life. Equally at home in the world of good books and bad politics, Brooklyn-born rappers and the work of Swiss novelists, she is by turns wry, heartfelt, indignant, and incisive–and never any less than perfect company. This is literary journalism at its zenith.” (GR)

 

2)Freshwater by  Akwaeke Emezi – (Feb. 13th)

freshwater

“Ada begins her life in the south of Nigeria as a troubled baby and a source of deep concern to her family. Her parents, Saul and Saachi, successfully prayed her into existence, but as she grows into a volatile and splintered child, it becomes clear that something went terribly awry. When Ada comes of age and moves to America for college, the group of selves within her grows in power and agency. A traumatic assault leads to a crystallization of her alternate selves: Asụghara and Saint Vincent. As Ada fades into the background of her own mind and these selves- now protective, now hedonistic- move into control, Ada’s life spirals in a dark and dangerous direction.” (GR)

 

3)The Belles by Dhonielle Clayton – (Feb. 6th)

belles

“Camellia Beauregard is a Belle. In the opulent world of Orléans, Belles are revered, for they control Beauty, and Beauty is a commodity coveted above all else. In Orléans, the people are born gray, they are born damned, and only with the help of a Belle and her talents can they transform and be made beautiful.” (GR)

 

4)All the Names They Used for God: Stories by Anjali Sachdeva – (Feb. 20th)

all the names they used

“Anjali Sachdeva’s debut collection spans centuries, continents, and a diverse set of characters but is united by each character’s epic struggle with fate: A workman in Andrew Carnegie’s steel mills is irrevocably changed by the brutal power of the furnaces; a fisherman sets sail into overfished waters and finds a secret obsession from which he can’t return; an online date ends with a frightening, inexplicable disappearance. Her story “Pleiades” was called “a masterpiece” by Dave Eggers. Sachdeva has a talent for creating moving and poignant scenes, following her highly imaginative plots to their logical ends, and depicting how one small miracle can affect everyone in its wake.” (GR)

 

5)A Dangerous Crossing by Ausma Zehanat Khan – (Feb. 13th)

crossing

“For Inspector Esa Khattak and Sergeant Rachel Getty, the Syrian refugee crisis is about to become personal. Esa’s childhood friend, Nathan Clare, calls him in distress: his sister, Audrey, has vanished from a Greek island where the siblings run an NGO. Audrey had been working to fast-track refugees to Canada, but now, she is implicated in the double-murder of a French Interpol agent and a young man who had fled the devastation in Syria.” (GR)

 

Non-Fiction:

6)Brit(ish): On Race, Identity and Belonging by Afua Hirsch – (Feb 1st)

brit-ish

“Brit(ish) is about a search for identity. It is about the everyday racism that plagues British society. It is about our awkward, troubled relationship with our history. It is about why liberal attempts to be ‘colour-blind’ have caused more problems than they have solved. It is about why we continue to avoid talking about race.” (GR)

 

7)Set the World on Fire: Black Nationalist Women and the Global Struggle for Freedom by Keisha N. Blain – (Feb 1st)

keisha n blain

“Gordon, Allen, and Jacques Garvey–as well as Maymie De Mena, Ethel Collins, Amy Ashwood, and Ethel Waddell–are part of an overlooked and understudied group of black women who take center stage in Set the World on Fire, the first book to examine how black nationalist women engaged in national and global politics from the early twentieth century to the 1960s. Historians of the era generally portray the period between the Garvey movement of the 1920s and the Black Power movement of the 1960s as an era of declining black nationalist activism, but Keisha N. Blain reframes the Great Depression, World War II, and early Cold War as significant eras of black nationalist–and particularly, black nationalist women’s–ferment.” (GR)

 

8)Ezili′s Mirrors: Imagining Black Queer Genders by Omise′eke Natasha Tinsley – (Feb.9th)

ezili

“From the dagger mistress Ezili Je Wouj and the gender-bending mermaid Lasiren to the beautiful femme queen Ezili Freda, the Ezili pantheon of Vodoun spirits represents the divine forces of love, sexuality, prosperity, pleasure, maternity, creativity, and fertility. And just as Ezili appears in different guises and characters, so too does Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley in her voice- and genre-shifting, exploratory book Ezili’s Mirrors. Drawing on her background as a literary critic as well as her quest to learn the lessons of her spiritual ancestors, Tinsley theorizes black Atlantic sexuality by tracing how contemporary queer Caribbean and African American writers and performers evoke Ezili. ” (GR)

 

9)The Pursuit of Happiness: Black Women, Diasporic Dreams, and the Politics of Emotional Transnationalism by Bianca C. Williams – (Feb. 9th)

pursuit of happiness

“In The Pursuit of Happiness Bianca C. Williams traces the experiences of African American women as they travel to Jamaica, where they address the perils and disappointments of American racism by looking for intimacy, happiness, and a connection to their racial identities. Through their encounters with Jamaican online communities and their participation in trips organized by Girlfriend Tours International, the women construct notions of racial, sexual, and emotional belonging by forming relationships with Jamaican men and other ‘girlfriends.'” (GR)

 

10)Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower by Brittney Cooper – (Feb. 20th)

eloquent rage

Eloquent Rage takes up this politics of critical dissent, asking: How do Black women resist stereotypical portrayals of them angry, aggressive, scary and violent? How do Black women dissent from a national narrative about heterosexual Black intimacy that says we are undesirable, unlovable, and unfit for partnerships or marriages? How do we dissent from religious patriarchy? How do we use our participation in politics to resist the march of fascism? How does our embrace of Beyoncé act as a kind of dissent against those who would dismiss as frivolous Black women’s pursuit of pleasure and joy? Drawing together her funny, poignant, and often heartbreaking experiences of friendship, family, and intimate relationships, with insights from her career as a professor of women’s and gender studies, Cooper writes compellingly about how Black women’s critical dissent shows up in the everyday lives of women.” (GR)

 

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finger icon Which February release are you looking forward to most?

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24 thoughts on “10 WOC Releases in February 2018

  1. Which MOST? How could I possibly say? So so many good choices. There’s a book coming out, a memoir of several generations of women in Trinidad, that I’m pretty excited for — Secrets We Kept by Krystal Sital? I want to start adding more Latin American literature into my reading diet.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Beautiful new releases, Bina! Thanks for featuring them! I didn’t know that Zadie Smith’s new essay collection was coming out! I loved her previous essay collection ‘Changing My Mind’. Can’t wait! So excited!

    Liked by 1 person

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