#RamadanReadathon TBR

ramadan-readathon

It’s June already somehow and as well as it being Pride Month, Nad and Zoya are hosting a readathon celebrating Muslim authors to coincide with Ramadan: #RamadanReadathon!

There are so many amazing works by Muslim writers, but sadly I’m not the fastest reader and I’m also trying to read some LGBTQIA+ books for Pride Month, but hopefully I’ll manage at least these 4 books. And yes, one of them also fits my Pride reading, although I have some more of those on my secret tbr (the book stack I really want to read, but will probably fail at spectacularly, so keeping seeecret 😀 ). Also, I will do a Pride Month tbr post soon as well.

loving you wasnt enough

Loving You Wasn’t Enough by Fatima Warsame gr-pic

Ebyan Jama has always led a life of clarity. She stayed away from boys, prayed everyday and never let even her most passionate dream to become a musician stand in the way of her faith. Her devotion to Islam and pride in her African roots provided her an unshakeable foundation. Unshakeable, until her world was turned upside down and her heart was ignited the moment she locked eyes with Noreen Iqbal. (goodreads)

size of a mustard seed

The Size of a Mustard Seed by Umm Juwayriyah gr-pic

Sullivan ushers in a new era of fiction–urban Islamic fiction–with this tale about Jameelah, a 27-year-old Muslim woman born to what appears to be one of the inner-city’s stronger blended American-Muslim families. (goodreads)

gauntlet

The Gauntlet by Karuna Riazi gr-pic

A trio of friends from New York City find themselves trapped inside a mechanical board game that they must dismantle in order to save themselves and generations of other children in this action-packed debut that’s a steampunk Jumanji with a Middle Eastern flair. (goodreads)

fire boy

Fire Boy by Sami Shah gr-pic

From Sami Shah comes Fire Boy, the first of a two-part urban fantasy set in modern-day Pakistan, where djinns roam the street alongside corrupt cops, hustling beggars, and creatures from the darkest corners of Islamic mythology. (goodreads)

A peaceful Ramadan, Muslim friends!

Are you participating in the readathon? Let me know what you’ll be reading!

[Review] God Smites and Other Muslim Girl Problems by Ishara Deen

god-smites-and-other-muslim-girl-problems

(How gorgeous is that cover!?)

Please note that my review is not written from an #ownvoices perspective, so I urge you to check out Saadia’s review,  MuslimahMediaWatch and Ruzaika’s thoughts!

***

Mysteries are my comfort reads, but the genre tends to be super white at first and often at second glance, too, so I’m always on the lookout for diverse mysteries. I was thrilled that I was given the opportunity to read God Smites, starring a Muslim teen girl detective and let me tell you, I know I’ll reread it often. Also, so happy to hear that there will be a sequel called Mutaweenies and Other Muslim Girl Problems!

In her debut novel, Ishara Deen introduces us to Asiya Haque, a Bengali-Canadian teen who tries juggling high-school, interning, crushes and family. Oh, and a murder mystery. God Smites opens with Asiya’s mother warning her daughter about boys, and Asiya’s internal monologue where she considers her religion and what she owes her mother is hilarious and sweet. Probably most people with Muslim, or even other religious, family will find these situations familiar ones. I also loved her loyal father and I have a cheeky but supportive younger brother myself. And Asiya’s best friend is such a great character who we’ll hopefully meet again, and I’m sure the gossiping aunties will return as well. It was so wonderful to read of close family ties and see complex, positive Muslim representation. Asiya is a fantastic and extremely likable protagonist, and I really appreciated the way she strove to be independent but in a way that spoke of respect and love for her family.

While out walking with her crush Michael, they stumble over a dead body and Asiya finds herself in the middle of the investigation. And just how is Michael involved in all of this? I’ve read a lot of mysteries and this one is so much more, but I really enjoyed guessing whodunnit and kinda-but-not figured it out. That cliffhanger though! I may be a mystery fan, but I feel confident in recommending God Smites to people who not usually go for mysteries. Still, this book gets a prime spot on my growing #DiverseDetectives shelf!

What I love is how Deen manages to make this a cozy crime, a coming-of-age story with a hilarious protagonist and also a book of social commentary on Islamophobia. That’s not an easy feat. I can only hope book like this will reach a wider audience, there’s so much unpacking of stereotypes and fears to do. But most of all, I hope Muslim teens will find Asiya. So make sure to review, buy and request God Smites at your library!

add-to-goodreads

twitter-button                                               Make sure to follow Ishara on twitter!

Disclaimer: I received a free e-copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review.

Other thoughts:

Reading and Gaming for Justice

Paper Wanderer

In Tori Lex

Building Diverse Bookshelves