The Diverse Books Tag

the-diversebooks-tag

This year Naz at Read Diverse Books started his own book tag, The Diverse Books Tag, which was predictably awesome! I took part on instagram but thought with the new blog focus I’d do a proper tag post. Since my focus is on reading women of Color I thought I’d look for/recommend a book for every category at the intersections of WOC. Also, as far as I’m aware these books are all #ownvoices. Lastly, I’m basically treating this as a personal tbr ūüėÄ

Here are the rules:

  1. Credit the original creator, Read Diverse Books.
  2. The Diverse Books Tag is a bit like a scavenger hunt. I will task you to find a book that fits a specific criteria and you will have to show us a book you have read or want to read.
  3. If you can’t think of a book that fits the specific category, then I encourage you to go look for one. A quick Google search will provide you with many books that will fit the bill. (Also, Goodreads lists are your friends.) Find one you are genuinely interested in reading and move on to the next category.

1. Find a book starring a lesbian character.

Jam on the Vine by LaShonda Katrice Barnett gr-pic

jam-on-the-vine-black-lesbian

A Black lesbian lit classic about¬†the first female-run African-American newspaper, Jam! On the Vine,¬†set during the Jazz age. Doesn’t that sound amazing?

2.Find a book with a Muslim protagonist.

Sofia Khan is Not Obliged by Ayisha Malik gr-pic

sofia-khan-is-not-obliged

Basically romance but I want to read more fun lit and I’ve heard good things about it from Muslim book bloggers, so will give it a try.

3.Find a book set in Latin America.

Malambo by  Lucia Charun-Illesca,translated from Spanish by Emmanuel Harris II. gr-pic

malambo-latinam

It’s important to seek out Afro-Latina voices and I read barely any Peruvian lit so this one sounded like a good start.

4.Find a book about a person with a disability.

Dirty River by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha gr-pic

dirty-river

Love her poetry and have a copy of her memoir waiting on my shelf.

5.Find a Science-Fiction or Fantasy book with a POC protagonist.

The Stars Change by Mary Anne Mohanraj gr-pic

the-stars-change

This is set on a South Asian settled university planet on the brink of war between humans, aliens and modified humans. This book is “an erotic science fiction novel-in-stories” and sounds pretty cool. If you’ve read this let me if it’s romance heavy please!

6.Find a book set in (or about) any country in Africa.

Go Tell the Sun by Wame Molefhe gr-pic

go-tell-the-sun

The stories in this collection are set in Botswana and I’ve read that there’s lesbian rep in at least one of them. The author also contributed a story to the Queer Africa collection.

7.Find a book written by an Indigenous or Native author.

Not Vanishing by Chrystos gr-pic

not-vanishing-chrystos

Menominee poet Chrystos is a “warrior, writer, and arrow in the throat of colonization.”

8.Find a book set in South Asia (Afghanistan, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, etc.).

The Quilt & Other Stories by Ismat Chughtai gr-pic

ismat-chughtai

Ismat Chughtai was a feminist Urdu writer exploring gender, sexuality and caste in Muslim India’s middle-class. So happy my friend Vishy gifted me¬†one of her books!

9.Find a book with a biracial protagonist.

The Girl Who Fell From the Sky by Heidi W. Durrow gr-pic

girl-fell-sky

The main character Rachel is the daughter of a white Danish mother and an African-American father and goes to live with her grandmother after a tragedy. I reviewed this book here.

10. Find a book starring a transgender character or about transgender issues.

Me Hijra, Me Laxmi by Laxmi gr-pic

me-hijra

This is the memoir of Indian hijra activist Laxmi. Though it has been translated from Marathi and apparently also slightly edited by the translators. Still on my tbr!

Have you read any of these? Where to start? Let me know in the comments!

Basically, everyone’s done this tag already but if not, consider yourself tagged! ūüôā

Review: Opal Charm + Interview with Author Miri Castor

miri-castor

The titular character of Opal Charm: The Path to Dawn, a¬†YA fantasy novel, is a Black (pre-)teen girl living in the quiet New York suburb of Dewdrop with her parents and sister. But Opal isn’t having the best time what with the death of her older brother, her sister alway snapping at her, no friends and parents who are in turns distant and all up in her space. Things seem to look up, however, when a new girl, Hope Adair, befriends Opal and Opal reconnects with her childhood¬†friend Aaron. But Opal keeps having these unsettling¬†dreams and there’s more to Hope¬†than meets the eye.

Opal is an unlikely heroine and a very reluctant one at that. Through much of the book, we also see her suffering from depression and having withdrawn from friends and others. Opal can be¬†unlikable and difficult, but her depression and isolation grow out of grief,¬†and I found myself empathizing with her, but also her family who were clearly overwhelmed with the situation. I thought I’d mention this as for much of the first part of the book the reason for Opal’s behavior might not be clear and¬†some might read her as simply annoying and be put off.

The Path to Dawn is the first part of a book series and I really enjoyed the focus on Opal’s situation and her overcoming isolation and reconnecting with people. It is only in the latter part of the book that the Chosen One aspect of the story really kicks off and we learn a bit about the troubled world of Athre and the gifts Athrians and Opal share, cause make no mistake this is gonna be a superhero story! A superhero who happens to be a Black girl, yass! I’m so happy to see more stories where the chosen one isn’t a white dude.

All in all I really enjoyed reading the beginning of Opal’s story. At times the dialogue and reactions by the characters felt¬†a bit off to me especially in the first few chapters and I would have liked to see a deeper exploration of Opal and Hope’s developing friendship. But I liked the long exposition and the focus on Opal’s struggles and the showdown at the end of this book seems like a promise that readers will find out what motivates¬†the different factions fighting in Athre. I’m also hoping to see more of how Opal’s family might reconnect and heal. I’ll be reading Hope in Nautical Dusk¬†or sure.

Make sure to scroll down to hear from the author, Miri Castor!

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Disclaimer: I was given a free e-copy of this book by the author, but never fear I remain my opinionated self!

Other thoughts:

CandidCeillie

(yours?)

**********************************************************************

kopie-von-diverse-mystery-month

Miri Castor is the author of Opal Charm: The Path to Dawn. She spent many recesses in middle school writing fantasy stories, with Opal Charm being one of many. She has written for Black Girl Magic Literary Magazine and was featured as a Spotlight New Author in 2016.
Now attending a university on the East Coast, she studies biochemistry and will receive her B.S. in 2016. A New York native, Miri is working on her second novel while in her last year as an undergraduate. She enjoys playing video games, attending music concerts, and strolling through the City.

Bina: What made you start writing and how do you manage writing while attending college?

Miri Castor: I was a huge bookworm back in the day. It started with me replacing the protagonists of my favorite SFF cartoons with my own characters when I was around eight years old. Then I started thinking after a few years, ‚Äúwouldn‚Äôt it be cool to give them their own stories?‚ÄĚ And that‚Äôs where I started.

Well, it was much easier when I was an undergraduate and had month-long breaks! As a college senior, I had a lot of time to dedicate to writing since I took a few classes. Now that I’m a first year in a PhD program, it’s a bit harder to manage with studies and research. I write with any downtime I can get.

Bina: Where do you draw your inspiration from?

Miri Castor: As a nerd, I‚Äôm inspired by my favorite video games, anime, and a handful of fantasy authors, like Tananarive Due. Music is another major source of inspiration.¬†Janelle Mon√°e’s music and style got me hooked into afrofuturism, as well as Solange, and a handful of alternative R&B singers.

Bina: What is your process with regard to feedback and editing as a self-published author?

Miri: I try to learn from all feedback I get, good or bad. I don’t let it interfere with my original ideas though. I feel like it’s definitely more personal as a self-published author to receive feedback because you usually don’t have a team behind you. You’re the editor, the artist (possibly), and the author.

Bina: Do you feel that self-publishing gives you more leeway with regard to diversity?

Miri: Definitely. I’d like to think in the near future traditional publishers won’t be as reluctant to showcase diverse books as they are now.

Bina:¬†In Opal you’ve created a (reluctant) superhero, who is also a young Black girl. Can you tell us about reading (or not) about Black characters growing up and what you hope to contribute to issues of representation with your books?

Miri: ‚ÄúReluctant‚ÄĚ is such a nice way of putting it, haha! That aside, the only black characters I read growing up were from urban fiction books. These characters were from the hood, and had to deal with issues around family, school, and their environment. It wasn‚Äôt a bad thing, but that was the only representation I got for black girls as a kid. I would‚Äôve loved to have read fantasy stories about magical black girls who became the chosen ones, and had to save the world.

My main goal with the Opal Charm series is to have humanizing portrayals of people of color, and to write stories the 12-year-old me would love.

Bina:¬†The Path to Dawn is the first book in a series, how many books are you planning and can you tell us a bit about what’s next for Opal?

Miri: I’ve planned for 4 books for the main series, but I also have prequels and spinoffs in mind. I’m especially excited to get started on the prequels!

Opal’s got a lot in store for her. She undergoes training to protect Earth and the alternate world Athre, while learning more about her powers, the secrets of each JAEL member, and herself. All I can say is Opal’s hopes for the future will be put to the test.

Bina: Thanks so much for answering my questions!

twitter Connect with Miri on twitter!

A New Beginning

A New Beginning

Welcome to WOCreads!

After book blogging for many years, I have found myself in need of a change. In these rough times, I have decided that I want and need the blog to be at once a statement and an archive and resource. Hopefully people looking for diverse literature, specifically by women of color, will find their next read here (and the next, and the one after that).

WocReads at once refers to the books I want to discuss in this space, and to myself, a woman of color who reads. So yes, this is personal. Much love to the #DiverseBookBloggers family for making me feel brave!

This blog is a work in progress and changing urls does not mean I’m going to be a super blogger. It’s just me claiming my corner! ūüôā

Best,

B.

Review: Posada-Offerings of Witness and Refuge by Xochitl-Julisa Bermejo

posada

In the four sections of her first¬†poetry collection, Posada- Offerings of Witness and Refuge,¬†Xochitl-Julisa Bermejo takes us¬†with her¬†through the multiple, imaginative and too real¬†border spaces of migration, language and belonging. In the first part, she¬†goes on a journey of remembering, collecting and reconstructing¬†her family’s history. Starting with the stolen metate they brought from¬† Teocaltiche, Bermejo connects the memories and stories of her family, from Uncle Manny’s recollections of his t√≠a Susana and her remedies to Bermejo’s¬†mother who was¬†“never gifted the story of her birth,”¬†presenting in her work¬†the “Pieces I’ve Gathered so Far.”

Part 2 demonstrates the way in which Bermejo draws inspiration from¬†Georgia O’Keeffe, Frida Kahlo and others and appropriately explores gender roles and the relationships of the women in her family, from mothers and daughters in “Frida’s Monkey Nurse:”

I tie her to this world never knowing

where the other will spit her out, never knowing

 when it will finally swallow her whole

to her relationship with her grandmother, to whom this collection is dedicated, in¬†“This Poem is for Nopales:”

Grandma, in the hospital room, when I kissed the fade of your cheek

to say goodbye, crisscrossing chin hairs caught my attention.

Now, when I look in the mirror and And hairs have bloomed overnight,

I think of roots. I think of you. I hope I can be a nopal woman too.

In part¬†3, “Things to Know for Compa√Īer@s.¬†A No More Deaths Volunteer Guide,” Bermejo draws on her work with the humanitarian organization No More Deaths, which gives medical aid and support along the border. Her poems bear witness to life and death on the migrant trail peppered with resilient cacti.

 Did you know?
 When barrel cacti become tombstones and their
 yellow starburst blooms offerings for the dead, you won’t be too cool to 
 belt Katy Perry songs.
Did you know?
Migrants are hurried over trails at night and without light. 
Their blisters are caused by continuous friction, muscle cramping by 
dehydration, vomiting by drinking bacteria ridden cow pond water, 
and those who move too slow are left behind.

In the last part, Bermejo pays witness to other/s’ stories of refuge and migration, connecting and piecing together similar and interrelated struggles from¬†Arizona to Chavez Ravine to¬†Gaza. She bears witness to tales of desperation, of refuge and migration and gives names and faces to those who too often remain just numbers to us. Posada¬†is a fantastic, visceral debut collection of social justice poetry, not only exploring the different meanings of borders, but also providing safe spaces and comfort for those straddling them.

Xochitl-Julisa Bermejo is a first generation Chicana. She is a 2016-2017 Steinbeck fellow and has received residencies with Hedgebrook, the Ragdale Foundation, and is a proud member of the Macondo Writers’ Workshop. In Los Angeles, she is a cofounder of Women Who Submit, a literary organization using social media and community events to empower women authors to submit work for publication, and curates the quarterly reading series HITCHED.

Posada: Offerings of Witness and Refuge is out today! Go get it here.

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Disclaimer: I was given an e-copy of this book by the publisher, Sundress Publications, but never fear I remain my opinionated self!

Thoughts: Gabi, A Girl in Pieces #HHM

gabi-girl-in-pieces

Gabi has a lot on her plate. It’s her last year of high school but apart from classes and college applications, she also has to deal with a father who is fighting a losing battle with meth addiction, her friend Cindy getting pregnant (as a result of date rape, we learn later), her other best friend Sebastian coming out, as well as exploring her own¬†sexuality and first relationships.

Isabel Quintero’s first novel¬†Gabi, A Girl in Pieces, published by CincoPuntoPress,¬†is a tour-de-force. The good thing about being blissfully ignorant about new releases and a lot of hype before joining twitter is that I mostly missed all the excitement and picked up this book only now because I vaguely remembered someone saying it was good and it being LatinX Heritage Month. So I got to skirt the overblown expectations trap, yay, but am totally doing this to you now with¬†this review. #sorrynotsorry

If you’re into intersectional feminism (you better be!), then this book will make you want to get out your highlighters.¬†Let me quote this section, which everyone else is apparently also quoting (google told me, but still thanks for the easy c&p)):

My mother named me Gabriella, after my grandmother who, coincidentally, didn‚Äôt want to meet me when I was born because my mother was unmarried, and therefore living in sin. My mom has told me the story many, many, MANY, times of how, when she confessed to my grandmother that she was pregnant with me, her mother beat her. BEAT HER! She was twenty-five. That story is the basis of my sexual education and has reiterated why it‚Äôs important to wait until you‚Äôre married to give it up. So now, every time I go out with a guy, my mom says, ‚ÄúOjos abiertos, piernas cerradas.‚ÄĚ Eyes open, legs closed. That‚Äôs as far as the birds and the bees talk has gone. And I don‚Äôt mind it. I don‚Äôt necessarily agree with that whole wait until you‚Äôre married crap, though. I mean, this is America and the 21st century; not Mexico one hundred years ago. But, of course, I can‚Äôt tell my mom that because she will think I‚Äôm bad. Or worse: trying to be White.

This excerpt really concisely introduces all the issues Quintero adresses in the novel and also drives home the point that Gabi lives at a very specific intersection of gender, race and ethnicity. So the novel explores one culture’s version of the double-standard, that of patriarchal machismo Mexican-American dichotomy of the virgen/puta. And Gabi has to realize that many women in her community have internalized this toxicity and police other women’s behavior and expression of sexuality (as they tend to, don’t get me started on this issue), her¬†mother among them:

“for my mother, a woman’s whole value is what’s between her legs. And once a man has access to that, she has no more value.”

Part of this patriarchal view is also the refusal to accept homosexuality and Gabi’s friend Sebastian is thrown out by his parents when he comes out. On the other side of the coin we have the boys will be boys mentality, about which Gabi writes a scathing poem.

Gabi is furthermore not marked Mexican-American by her skin color, instead she is so light-skinned she can pass as white but as a result has to deal with feeling alienated at times. Since I basically have the opposite problem, this was an interesting change in perspective.

The book also shows Gabi’s acceptance when it comes to her body and she moves¬†from regarding herself as a “fatgirl” to acceptance. There’s a terrible lack of “fativism” in books and hopefully this will change in coming years, but it’s another reason why I hope Gabi will be read and taught widely, so these young women will see themselves represented too.

I also loved was watching Gabi coming into her own as a poet, apart from the diary¬†style of the novel, we also get to read Gabi’s poetry and her attempts at spoken word. Poetry is how Gabi finds a way to express and empower herself. Her words are sharp and to the point and you’ll want to pick up a poetry collection immediately after finishing this book (I’ll be gushing about¬†one particular, exciting collection later this week, stay tuned!).

The language use is wonderfully done as well, I’m glad there’s no glossary and hardly any translations. Quintero makes me work for it and I gladly got out my rusty Spanish for beginners knowledge, and between knowing other romance language and guessing from context…no excuses people! I’m sure LatinX will love this book and the intermingling of English and Spanish…Spanglish? And us other readers do well to remember to work on our privilege.

It’s amazing that this is a first novel. It’s a book that will be taught in high schools and colleges everywhere!

Other thoughts:

Reading the End

Twinja Book Reviews

Life of a Female Bibliophile

Have you reviewed this book? Let me know and I’ll add a link!

Women of Color & Horror: 10 On My TBR

woc horror blog pic final

It’s September and for me finally the beginning of the creepy season, huzzah! I’ll just ignore that last small heat wave this week, go away please summer, I have my tea and candles and creepy reads ready! I have a lot of books on my tbr that fall under speculative, horror and mystery, but I’m also working towards seeking out and supporting more women writers of Color. I’ve chosen horror because it’s a genre I’ve been wanting to explore more and because, like science-fiction and fantasy, ¬†horror can offer women of Color a space in which to disturb social conventions and¬†transgress boundaries.

This here is a list of 10 works by WoC writers¬†that can be considered horror (often also fantasy) and some of which¬†may be new to¬†you as well. Let’s start with a better known one:

white-is-for-witching

White is for Witching by Helen Oyeyemi gr-pic

Haunted house story and a reworking of the gothic trope, Oyeyemi’s work is a psychological fest around trauma, racism and a sentient house set in Dover, England. I hope I’ll get to read it finally for RIPXI.

fabulous beasts

Fabulous Beasts by Priya Sharma gr-pic

This is a novelette or short story about two sisters or cousins and childhood abuse set in gritty Liverpool. Apparently it’s super disturbing and comes with trigger warnings for abuse, rape and incest, yikes! It’s published by TOR though.

alyssa wong

Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers by Alyssa Wong gr-pic

Silicon recommended Alyssa Wong’s stories to me and I’ll definitely read at least one this fall since her recs are always on point. This story has also received the Nebula Award for Best Short Fiction. It’s got a vampire and is about dating and relationships!

rena mason

The Evolutionist by Rena Mason gr-pic

Set in the suburbs of Las Vegas, Stacy keeps dreaming about killing and dismembering people. She feels she’s just a normal person having very vivid nightmares and so Stacy goes to see a psychiatrist, he turns out to be not quite so normal.

unhallowed graves

Unhallowed Graves by Nuzo Onoh gr-pic

“Oja-ale is the night market run by the dead. Everything can be bought for a deadly price. Alan Pearson is a sceptical British diplomat, contemptuous and dismissive of native superstitions…Until the day he receives a terrifying purchase from the Night Market, which defies Western science and logic.” (GR) Onoh is “queen of African horror.”

solitude

Solitude by Sumiko Saulson gr-pic

“Solitude is the riveting tale of diverse individuals isolated in a San Francisco seemingly void of all other human life. In the absence of others, each journeys into personal web of beliefs and perceptions as they try to determine what happened to them, and the world around them.” (GR) Saulson also curates a Black women in horror list here.

crescendo

Crescendo by L. Marie Woods gr-pic

¬†James’ comfortable¬†life changes when he begins having nightmares after his lover’s death. A¬†family curse, can he do anything or is this his destiny? Everyone in his family has secrets. Set in tranquil Rockland County, New York.

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Age of Blight by Kristine Ong Muslim gr-pic

“What if the end of man is not caused by some cataclysmic event, but by the nature of humans themselves? In Age of Blight, a young scientist’s harsh and unnecessary experiments on monkeys are recorded for posterity; children are replaced by their doppelgangers, which emerge like flowers in their backyards; and two men standing on opposing cliff faces bear witness to each other’s terrifying ends.” (GR) A collection of short stories with illustrations.

linda ddison

How to Recognize a Demon Has Become Your Friend by Linda Addison gr-pic

“From the first African-American to receive the HWA Bram Stoker award, this collection of both horror and science fiction short stories and poetry reveals demons in the most likely people (like a jealous ghost across the street) or in unlikely places (like the dimension-shifting dreams of an American Indian). Recognition is the first step, what you do with your friends/demons after that is up to you.” (GR)

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My Soul to Keep by Tananarive Due gr-pic

And of course¬†one of my favorite writers! Last year I read Due’s The Good House and it was wonderfully atmospheric and I will make to read this one in broad daylight.

“When Jessica marries David, he is everything she wants in a family man: brilliant, attentive, ever youthful. Yet she still feels something about him is just out of reach. Soon, as people close to Jessica begin to meet violent, mysterious deaths, David makes an unimaginable confession: More than 400 years ago, he and other members of an Ethiopian sect traded their humanity so they would never die, a secret he must protect at any cost. Now, his immortal brethren have decided David must return and leave his family in Miami.” (GR)

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And a great¬†opportunity to read horror and more with other book bloggers is Carl’s wonderful yearly challenge, R.I.P. – Readers Imbibing Peril, going on right now! It’s a book blogging institution and now in its 11th year.¬†The challenge¬†takes place from September 1st, 2016 through October 31st, 2016 and offers many¬†different levels and genres, there’s something for everyone in it. Sign up here. I’ll be doing Peril the Second, but I hope I’ll read much more than two creepy reads.

Definitely take a look¬†at Sharlene’s wonderful recs for a more diverse R.I.P¬†here, she has great recommendation for all RIP genres, I know I’ll be reading The Hunter.

Lastly, check out my Queer Horror post for some creepy reading with LGBTQIA+ themes.

What are you all reading this creepy season? Let me know in the comments!

Review: What Sunny Saw in the Flames

sunny ic for review

What Sunny Saw In The Flames, previously published in the US as Akata Witch, is one of the books by one of my favorite writers that I hadn’t read yet. Published by Cassava Republic, the book is out in the UK now! So run to the nearest bookstore!

What Sunny Saw is a wonderful tale of magic and growing into yourself set in Nigeria. Our protagonist¬†Sunny Nwazue is 12 years old with albinism, she is also American-born, like the author, only having moved to Nigeria when she was 9. The US-title Akata Witch, a slur for American-born Africans further drives home this facet of¬†Sunny’s identity. Living in the town of Aba with her parents and younger brothers,¬†Sunny is furthermore Igbo, one ethnicity in Nigeria. I love this representation of complex identities that also mirror my own experience. We are rarely ever just A or B and this novel also shows the Nigerian perspective, people emigrating, people returning, and people visiting. This goes against most Western tales around movement and immigration which usually¬†only present us with that infamous single story.

We first get an inkling of what is to come, when Sunny, as the title promises, sees something in the flame of a candle. Her vision is of a terrible future and shakes her to the core. She begins the get some answers, when she befriends Orlu and Chichi, who introduce her to the world of the Leopard People. Together with Sasha, they form a quartet of magical students, learning about their juju abilities and spirit selves. But Sunny has the most to learn as she is what is called a free agent, a Leopard person whose parents are Lambs (non-magical). However, her vision looms over her newly-discovered identity and soon the group must face the evil Black Hat.

Inevitably comparisons with¬†Harry Potter come up, but as Brendon importantly points out, “We must stop comparing literature and stories in this way because it gives all the credit to the stories of privilege (White, western, straight, male/man, able).” And so, what annoys me with¬†these comparisons is that Harry Potter and other white, Western works are irretrievably set up as originator of certain plots or the origin from which all else strays. However, as we know, Rowling as well as many other Western writers before her have and continue to “borrow” from other works, mythologies and cultures.

World-building is something that I find Okorafor just excels at.¬†I really enjoyed the culture of the Leopard People¬†and also the book inside the book:¬†Fast Facts for Free Agents by Isong Abong Effiong Isong.¬†I’d love to read more from it. Leopard culture is steeped in Igbo and other West African culture and after my last read taught me about Yoruba culture, it was great to revisit and learn more about the Igbo. Some of these days I need to pick up some more non-Western mythology works! It’s a wonderfully diverse world in What Sunny Saw, and the Leopard community too is made up of various ethnic groups and the African diaspora and globalization have led to secret communities all over the world!

I also appreciated the depiction of everyday struggles of girls in how Sunny has to deal with an abusive father and housework is of course made her chore. Sunny is clever and fierce though and uses some of these expectations to keep her juju abilities and Leopard identity secret from her family.

I would complain about the ending seeming a tad abrupt, but really I enjoy the learning about other worlds parts of books more than violent showdowns so I don’t care,¬†I just had the best time reading this one! Cannot wait for the sequel!!

Other thoughts:

Gaming for Justice

what the log had to say

Spirit blog

Zezee with Books

Have you reviewed this book? Let me know and I’ll link!

Disclaimer: I received a free e-book from the publisher, but never fear I remain my opinionated self!