12 WOC Releases in November 2018

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I’m a tad late with this post, but on the upside it means many of these books are out already or will be very soon! And have you seen these amazing book releases!? I need them all!

1.Well-Read Black Girl: Finding Our Stories, Discovering Ourselves by Glory Edim, ed.

Black girl

November 1st 2018 by Trapeze

“Remember that moment when you first encountered a character who seemed to be written just for you? That feeling of belonging remains with readers the rest of their lives – but not everyone regularly sees themselves reflected on the pages of a book. In this timely anthology, Glory Edim, founder of the online community, Well-Read Black Girl, brings together original essays by some of America’s best black women writers to shine a light on how important it is that we all – regardless of gender, race, religion, or ability – have the opportunity to find ourselves in literature.” (GR)

 

2.Little Dreamers: Visionary Women Around the World by Vashti Harrison

little dreamers

November 6th 2018 by Puffin

“In the follow up to her beloved debut Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History, Vashti Harrison introduces little readers to even more trailblazing women, from writers to inventors, artists to scientists. Discover inspirational heroines like: Zaha Hadid, Hedy Lamarr, Wangari Maathai, Mary Blair, Chien-Shiung Wu, Frida Kahlo.” (GR)

 

3.Kingdom of the Blazing Phoenix by Julie C. Dao

kingdom of

November 6th 2018 by Philomel Books

Princess Jade has grown up in exile, hidden away in a monastery while her stepmother, the ruthless Xifeng, rules as empress of Feng Lu. But the empire is in distress and its people are sinking into poverty and despair. Even though Jade doesn’t want the crown, she knows she is the only one who can dethrone the empress and set the world right. Ready to reclaim her place as rightful heir, Jade embarks on a quest to raise the Dragon Lords and defeat Xifeng and the Serpent God once and for all. But will the same darkness that took Xifeng take Jade, too? Or will she find the strength within to save herself, her friends, and her empire?” (GR)

 

4.The Storyteller by Traci Chee

storyteller

November 13th 2018 by G.P. Putnam’s

“Sefia is determined to keep Archer out of the Guard’s clutches and their plans for war between the Five Kingdoms. The Book, the ancient, infinite codex of the past, present and future, tells of a prophecy that will plunge Kelanna in that bloody war, but it requires a boy—Archer—and Sefia will stop at nothing to ensure his safety. The Guard has already stolen her mother, her father, and her Aunt Nin. Sefia would sooner die than let them take anymore from her—especially the boy she loves.” (GR)

 

5.Toxic by Lydia Kang

toxic

November 6th 2018 by Entangled

“Cyclo, the first and largest biological ship of its kind, is dying. A small crew of mercenaries have handed over the rights to their life to document the death of the ship, but the abandoned ship is anything but abandoned―one girl has been left behind. Hana has known nothing but the isolation of a single room and the secret that has kept her there for seventeen years. When she meets Fennec, the boy assigned to watch her, she realizes that there is a world she has yet to experience but she is doomed to never meet.” (GR)

 

6.Beyoncé in Formation: Remixing Black Feminism by Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley

in formation

November 6th 2018 by University of Texas Press

“Woven with candid observations about her life as a feminist scholar of African studies and a cisgender femme married to a trans spouse, Tinsley’s “Femme-onade” mixtape explores myriad facets of black women’s sexuality and gender. Turning to Beyoncé’s “Don’t Hurt Yourself,” Tinsley assesses black feminist critiques of marriage and then considers the models of motherhood offered in “Daddy Lessons,” interspersing these passages with memories from Tinsley’s multiracial family history. Her chapters on nontraditional bonds culminate in a discussion of contemporary LGBT politics through the lens of the internet-breaking video “Formation,” underscoring why Beyoncé’s black femme-inism isn’t only for ciswomen. From pleasure politics and the struggle for black women’s reproductive justice to the subtext of blues and country music traditions, the landscape in this tour is populated by activists and artists (including Loretta Lynn) and infused with vibrant interpretations of Queen Bey’s provocative, peerless imagery and lyrics.” (GR)

 

7.The Kinship of Secrets by Eugenia Kim

kinship

November 6th 2018 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

“In 1948 Najin and Calvin Cho, with their young daughter Miran, travel from South Korea to the United States in search of new opportunities. Wary of the challenges they know will face them, Najin and Calvin make the difficult decision to leave their other daughter, Inja, behind with their extended family; soon, they hope, they will return to her. But then war breaks out in Korea, and there is no end in sight to the separation. Miran grows up in prosperous American suburbia, under the shadow of the daughter left behind, as Inja grapples in her war-torn land with ties to a family she doesn’t remember. Najin and Calvin desperately seek a reunion with Inja, but are the bonds of love strong enough to reconnect their family over distance, time, and war? And as deep family secrets are revealed, will everything they long for be upended?” (GR)

 

8.Monument: Poems New and Selected by Natasha Trethewey

monument

November 6th 2018 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

“Layering joy and urgent defiance—against physical and cultural erasure, against white supremacy whether intangible or graven in stone—Trethewey’s work gives pedestal and witness to unsung icons. Monument, Trethewey’s first retrospective, draws together verse that delineates the stories of working class African American women, a mixed-race prostitute, one of the first black Civil War regiments, mestizo and mulatto figures in Casta paintings, Gulf coast victims of Katrina. Through the collection, inlaid and inextricable, winds the poet’s own family history of trauma and loss, resilience and love.” (GR)

 

9. Becoming by Michelle Obama

becoming

November 13th 2018 by Crown

“In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms.” (GR)

 

10.My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite

my sister

November 20th 2018 by Doubleday

“Korede is bitter. How could she not be? Her sister, Ayoola, is many things: the favorite child, the beautiful one, possibly sociopathic. And now Ayoola’s third boyfriend in a row is dead. Korede’s practicality is the sisters’ saving grace. She knows the best solutions for cleaning blood, the trunk of her car is big enough for a body, and she keeps Ayoola from posting pictures of her dinner to Instagram when she should be mourning her “missing” boyfriend. Not that she gets any credit. A kind, handsome doctor at the hospital where Korede works, is the bright spot in her life. She dreams of the day when he will realize they’re perfect for each other. But one day Ayoola shows up to the hospital uninvited and he takes notice. When he asks Korede for Ayoola’s phone number, she must reckon with what her sister has become and what she will do about it.” GR)

 

11.All the Lives We Never Lived by Anuradha Roy

all the lives

November 20th 2018 by Atria Books

“So begins the story of Myshkin and his mother, Gayatri, a rebellious, alluring artist who abandons parenthood and marriage to follow her primal desire for freedom. Though freedom may be stirring in the air of India, across the world the Nazis have risen to power in Germany. At this point of crisis, a German artist from Gayatri’s past seeks her out. His arrival ignites passions she has long been forced to suppress. What follows is her life as pieced together by her son, a journey that takes him through India and Dutch‑held Bali. Excavating the roots of the world in which he was abandoned, he comes to understand his long‑lost mother, and the connections between strife at home and a war‑torn universe overtaken by patriotism.” (GR)

 

12.How Long ’til Black Future Month?: Stories by N.K. Jemisin

jemisin how long

November 27th 2018 by Orbit

“In these stories, Jemisin sharply examines modern society, infusing magic into the mundane, and drawing deft parallels in the fantasy realms of her imagination. Dragons and hateful spirits haunt the flooded city of New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In a parallel universe, a utopian society watches our world, trying to learn from our mistakes. A black mother in the Jim Crow south must figure out how to save her daughter from a fey offering impossible promises. And in the Hugo award-nominated short story “The City Born Great,” a young street kid fights to give birth to an old metropolis’s soul.” (GR)

 

*****

What’s on your November tbr? Which book are you most looking forward to reading?

9 thoughts on “12 WOC Releases in November 2018

Add yours

  1. Wonderful list, Bina! I want to read ‘Monument’ by Natasha Trethewey. We read Anuradha Roy’s ‘All the Lives We Never Lived’ for book club last month 🙂 Michelle Obama’s memoir is all over the news today! Thanks for sharing this list, Bina!

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  2. Bina, another interesting list of new releases by women of colour, in particular I like the sound of Kingdom of the Blazing Phoenix by Julie C. Dao. This month, I am reading the short story anthology Zombie edited by Christopher Golden and the classic Christian allegory The Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan.

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